A 600 Mile Family Trip Turns into an Amateur Photographer’s Dream (Featured on Browngirlmagazine.com)

A 600 Mile Family Trip Turns into an Amateur Photographer’s Dream (Featured on Browngirlmagazine.com)

Dhara Singh

After my trip to Greece this past May, I was craving another fun-filled, picturesque vacation. I flipped through Vogue’s travel section intrigued by both Mérida, Mexico and Prague, Czech Republic. I was practically drooling over how beautiful both these destinations were. Unfortunately I soon realized with a low budget that dream just wasn’t happening this year.

However, one weekend morning my parents told me in the upcoming days we were going to go on a 600 mile (not kidding you, 600 mile) road trip to visit several relatives in the United States, many of whom I had never met before. Initially, I was dreading the possibility of awkward conversations and being sedentary for so long, but then I spotted my DSLR resting on my desk. I thought hey there might be some nice views to capture. It was another chance to finally practice photography.

If I couldn’t splurge on an…

View original post 606 more words

Discussing Chako, The Anglophile in The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy

Discussing Chako, The Anglophile in The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy

Dhara Singh

(This blog post was written using The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy as well as Ania Loomba’s Colonialism/Post Colonialism.)

In The God of Small Things, we witness a cultural paradox present in an Aymanam based family. Despite their Indian ethnicity, family members often speak in the English language. Loomba’s assertion that “colonial identities…are unstable, agonized, and in constant flux” especially describes characters such as Chako in the novel (Loomba 149). Although Chacko is quick to characterize others as Anglophiles, he himself uses the English language to place himself on a pedestal above his Indian counterparts. Loomba’s quotes resonates well in a post-colonial period, in which Indians struggle to retain their native culture in a backdrop of British influences.

Chacko’s allegiance to the English language heightens after a college education at Oxford. Although he is well versed in his native tongue Malayalam, he uses English to emphasize his superiority…

View original post 837 more words

Thank You Hari Kondabolu for “The Problem With Apu” Documentary. Whose Responsibility is it Now?

Thank You Hari Kondabolu for “The Problem With Apu” Documentary. Whose Responsibility is it Now?

Dhara Singh

One day I was scrolling through my Facebook news feed and suddenly I see friends sharing articles of an upcoming documentary about the one and only Apu from the Simpsons. The one hour long documentary was to live stream on truTV, and reporters from NPR, Variety, and Mashable were already giving the inside scoop. This past Sunday night curiosity lead me to secure a temporary free trial on Hulu to watch the documentary.

To be quite frank, I had no idea who Hari Kondabolu was and that a channel called truTV even existed. (I promise I don’t live under a rock!) However, a discussion on stereotypes and the advancement of South Asians in media will always, guaranteed, peak my interest.

It is ironic first of all, to note that Hari Kondabolu, who created and hosts this documentary is a comedian himself. As clips in the documentary show, prior to 9/11…

View original post 885 more words

Understanding The Color of Water, A Black Man’s Tribute to His White Mother (Featured on Thrive Global)

Understanding The Color of Water, A Black Man’s Tribute to His White Mother (Featured on Thrive Global)

"Her oddness, her complete non-awareness of what the world thought of her, a nonchalance in the face of what I perceived to be an imminent danger from blacks and whites who disliked her for being a white person in black neighborhood."