Discussing Chako, The Anglophile in The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy

Discussing Chako, The Anglophile in The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy

Dhara Singh

(This blog post was written using The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy as well as Ania Loomba’s Colonialism/Post Colonialism.)

In The God of Small Things, we witness a cultural paradox present in an Aymanam based family. Despite their Indian ethnicity, family members often speak in the English language. Loomba’s assertion that “colonial identities…are unstable, agonized, and in constant flux” especially describes characters such as Chako in the novel (Loomba 149). Although Chacko is quick to characterize others as Anglophiles, he himself uses the English language to place himself on a pedestal above his Indian counterparts. Loomba’s quotes resonates well in a post-colonial period, in which Indians struggle to retain their native culture in a backdrop of British influences.

Chacko’s allegiance to the English language heightens after a college education at Oxford. Although he is well versed in his native tongue Malayalam, he uses English to emphasize his superiority…

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Understanding The Color of Water, A Black Man’s Tribute to His White Mother (Featured on Thrive Global)

Understanding The Color of Water, A Black Man’s Tribute to His White Mother (Featured on Thrive Global)

"Her oddness, her complete non-awareness of what the world thought of her, a nonchalance in the face of what I perceived to be an imminent danger from blacks and whites who disliked her for being a white person in black neighborhood."

Hybridity in The God of Small Things By Arundhati Roy

Hybridity in The God of Small Things By Arundhati Roy

One can argue that hybrid identities ultimately result from the failure of colonialism to "civilize" its others and to fix them into perpetual "otherness" (Loomba 145). The twins could have been similar to their uncle Chacko, an Oxford graduate, by continuously asserting their knowledge of English language and literature. However, neither twin celebrates entirely their English or Indian cultural influences. They simply read English literature to their elders when directed.